Little River Regiment

Little River Regiment

Petition of James Williams' Little River Regiment

In the following document we have a petition by members of the Little River Regiment to the Gov. of S. C. protesting the arrest of their Commanding Officer, Col. James Williams. It is transcribed from a document in the Manuscript collection of the Wm. R. Perkins Library, Duke University. #5767 "James Williams Petition. The document is undated and signed with legible signatures of all included.
 

1784, The Hanging of Matthew Love

http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~scroots/sc00055.htm



From the State of South Carolina
A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION TO REQUEST THAT THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NAME THE BRIDGE THAT CROSSES THE LITTLE RIVER ALONG SOUTH CAROLINA HIGHWAY 72 IN LAURENS COUNTY THE "PATRIOTS OF THE LITTLE RIVER REGIMENT MEMORIAL BRIDGE" IN HONOR OF THE LITTLE RIVER REGIMENT WHICH WAS A GATHERING OF PATRIOTS OF THE OLDE 96 DISTRICT DURING THE AMERICAN REVOLUTIONARY WAR, AND TO ERECT APPROPRIATE SIGNS OR MARKERS AT THIS BRIDGE THAT CONTAIN THE WORDS "PATRIOTS OF THE LITTLE RIVER REGIMENT MEMORIAL BRIDGE".

 

http://miniawi.blogspot.com/2009/02/little-river-regiment.html

Mary Ramage Dillard
Mary Ramage Dillard

From: Carolina Herald, March 1990.... by Thomas L. Wallis

Mary Ramage Dillard, a daughter of John and Jean (Jane) Adair Ramage of Laurens District, South Carolina, was born during the early 1760's. Mary was the wife of James Dillard, who was born in 1755 in Culpeper County, Virginia. James had settled in what is now Laurens County when he was seven years old. James and Mary lived near the South Fork Creek in the eastern section of Laurens County.

Both Mary's father, John Ramage, and maternal grandfather, Joseph Adair, Sr., were American Patriots in Laurens District. Mary's husband James Dillard served as a Captain in the American Revolution. Mary is considered a Revolutionary Heroine because of her midnight ride to warn the American Patriots of an impending attack. It seems that her husband, Capt James Dillard, was away from home at the time serving in the American Army. A group of British and Tory soldiers came to Mary's home and ordered Mary to prepare them a meal. While serving the meal, Mary overheard them discussing that they would attack the American Army. After they left, Mary mounted a horse, not even taking time to saddle it, and carried the information to the American Patriots. She had a baby son to deal with and having no time to find somewhere to leave him, Mary lifted the bed post and sat it down on the end of his dressing gown, keeping the baby from safe while he slept. Her effort is said to have prevented a Tory victory at Blackstocks which was Tarleton's first defeat in South Carolina. Tarleton later recalled seeing a woman on horseback among the trees bordering his march and he believed that she reported him to Sumter.

On another occasion, Mary numbered the British Army while they marched down the road near her home. By counting the men in each file and then counting the number of files, she was able to calculate the number of British. She gave this information to her husband who passed it to the commander of the American Patriots. On two occasions during the Revolution the Dillard's home was burned but this did not discourage their desire for American Independence.

History records that Mary Ramage Dillard was a beautiful woman, remarkably little and very active. After the Revolution, James and Mary continued to live in Laurens County where they reared their family, They had seven children: John Dillard, George Washington Dillard, Priscilla Ramage Dillard, Mary (Polly) Dillard, Jane (Jennie) Dillard, Elizabeth (Betsy) Dillard and Samuel H. Dillard.

Mary was a member of a family who supported independence during the American Revolution. Mary Ramage dillard's father, John Ramage, her maternal grandfather, Joseph Adair, and her husband, Capt. Jamrs dillard, fought for American independence during the Revolution. Capt. James and Mary had a large home on the Enoree River, opposite the Musgrove plantation. On two occasions, Capt. James and Mary Ramage Dillard's home was burned by the British and/or the Tories but this did not discourage their desire for American independence.




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